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presentation will be michael from "time" magazine to give the land scape in politics and what's happening. i'll run through a little -- some of the questions that i think we might m to be asking, the beyond sticker shock questions, do that quickly, and then we'll -- and then we'll be joined by trevor potter, katherine -- trevor potter, a partner in captain and drive, and dale. we know him for years, but now the world knows him, and katherine maggie ward is a fellow here at new america and editing manager of "reason" magazine. in addition to moderating, she can provide provocation which is useful. with no further adieu, thank you, all, for coming, and i'll tern it over to michael. >> i wonder who knew trevor when he was a lawyer for john mccain, an important job, nothing like being a lawyer for steven cobehr. maybe one day i can work for comedy central and people can be impressed. a brief overview. this is a graphic we ran in "time" at the end of july this summer trying the best at that moment in time to project out where the money was comes from and what the difference would be in terms of v
immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free country.org. she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political rallies. sounds like a much better assignment. [laughter] she appears on the takeaway and contributed to npr, bbc, wgvh, new york 1 and pbs. next to her is greg marx who's a staff writer for the columbia journalism review, co-editor of cjr's swing state project. he was a writer for remapping debate.org, and if you've seen his writings, which i have fold over the last few week -- followed over the last few wee
michaels, first business network interview telling us about it and revealing its big celebrity spokesperson. somebody very famous will be their celebrity spokesperson. he will reveal that on fox business. you do not want to miss it. that is in the next hour. convicted insider trader raj rajaratnam should have followed the example of a lesser-known figure and fled the country rather than face years behind bars. recommending people flee the country? >> i knew someone who knew someone who fled to italy and a strong extradition treaty from italy to the u.s.. generally force you to come back. india and sri lanka where he is from, is not that strong. it is the interesting thing in this case. there is one fugitive, one person who was busted his name is deep shop, an analyst at moody's gave a tip to a woman who is the main witness on hilton being bought by blackstone and that was one of the counts he was convicted of. he is a fugitive. you went back to indiana and fired and indicted by the justice department and filed civil charges and there was one lame attempt to get him like a local magistrate t
the sponsor of this particular pavilion, history and biography. in a moment, i introduce to you michael l. golden, wells fargo's regional president for greater washington, d.c., who will introduce our closing authors today. we're privileged to have with him, of course, not only an extraordinary biographer but also the two inheritors of the legacy of the man who is not only led what is often called the greatest generation to victory in the world war ii, but also led the country to eight years of peace and prosperity, which are now becoming recognized in good part thanks to these authors we have with us today, to close things out. being recognized by historians for the contribution he has made to our national life. so, ladies and gentlemen, i'm happy to hand over for the last act in your main tent, wells fargo sponsored for us, mr. golden, who will introduce everybody and it's a tremendous closing act, if you like, to a wonderful day, blessed with sunshine, with all your presence, and i think we've got an extraordinary cast for this which he will be pleased ands to introduce, and i'm sure w
deliberately chose michael carr as one of the scientists to interview for my book was he retired -- because he retired right after he was at jpl. so to see that kind of transition. >> uh-huh. let's talk about the dangers of anthroto moretizing our rovers as we put them up there. i was following the tweets of the martian -- of curiosity, and ask sometimes they bridged into the adult. and it was great fun, it was wonderful, but as soon as you start injecting that humanity, you -- a lot of people get in trouble on twitter. [laughter] i was wondering about how much of a burden it is to say, oh, now this is as much our mascot as it is our scientist. >> well, i think that is the truth. and that was probably my biggest surprise in going through my work over these eight years, because i did start, as i said, rather upset when i first saw that 2001 press release. i was at hart and rater in july when it came out, and i remember ranting and raving to anyone who would listen to me who is this steve squires, and why is he saying these on sudden things? robot wick geologists, we're in -- robotic geologists,
are a few of the comments. michael tweeted us from chicago saying obama's performance seemed like team usa day three ryder cup. bad start, worst finish. jeff says two strikes for obama after his luke warm dnc talk, as well. if you want to keep the conversation going, you can get in touch with us by e-mail at world by twide at cnbc.com, @cn, or at beccy meehan. we have one viewer bruce who says that arrogance and ego hurt obama badly and may cost him the election. thanks for your comments. one viewer says romney was in command trhful a georgia net tick, obama was defensive, evasive and tired. incoming president always has the disadvantage of being really busy running the country, as well. but thanks so much for your comments. do continue to write in and let me know what you think. that's it for today's show. thanks so much for watching "worldwide exchange." appreciate your company. >>> good morning. today's top stories, a clash of the candidates. president obama and mitt romney square off on policy differences including taxes, spending, entitlements, health care, education and more. it was
to not just like it, but want it. they're teaming up with several retailers including michael kors and victoria secret to test a want button. users can create a wish list of products. facebook shares did fall almost 2.5% on monday, but trading above the 20 buck level and i guess the question is whether the want button becomes as widely used as like. >> i want a yacht, i want a ski chalet, i want a helicopter. does not mean if i put that on, i just get those is this. >> you'd think if anything, i know this has been controversial, but that they would do something more oppose. a dislike or -- >> that's a bit negative. >> they have to commercialize it. >> drives me crazy. >> talking of want, if you've ever wanted your own sports team or arena, it's time to search between the couch cushions for loose change because reports suggest the auction of the staples center. they're seeking bids. $10 billion. >> i believe they also have big contracts with celine dion. so if you're a fan, could you get a private contract. >>> looking for my checkbook. still to come, u.s. treasury secretary timothy
, senator michael bennett from colorado, who is a newer, younger member who is part of the generation that does not understand why congress works so slowly. on the republican side they added another newcomer to the senate, senator mike johans. they are meeting this week. it is different since congress is on recess, and congress has not been here since early- august. lawmakers are home, campaigning in their states or for their colleagues tried to get majorities shored up in both the house and senate. so, a group is coming into town tomorrow for a meeting off- campus at mount vernon, which is a good place for them to meet if they want to avoid reporters who tend to stop the halls and wait out the meetings to get any little snippets of news. host: from politico this week, how secret is there work? i mean, how much do we know about what they talk about, when they are meeting, and what they're doing? guest: i would say the problems the country and this congress face are known. you could easily look back over many reports and the public and private meetings to understand that most outside o
michael moore, nancy pelosi. think your local college professor. you know, think the driver of the crazy car with all of the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole foods store. you get the picture; right? they no , nominate professions leaving a cultural imprint, cultures like journal ism, arts, academia, and america's fastest band of intertapers, circumstance day sew lay success bats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small group impact our lives? what motivates them? i'm in an excellent position to answer the deep questions because i've been watching liberals closely for over 30 years, studied liberals like jane goodall studies her chimps. [laughter] in their natural habitats and without judgment, in silence mostly because we barely speak the same language. i've been tireless in research. i lived with liberals, broke bread with them, humored them, teased them, prodded them, and, yes, even loved some of them, some my friends, and some members of my own family. my commitme
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9